ReSkin, Silicone Skin Technology

support

SKIN AT RISK

The human skin is a protective barrier against germs, liquids and dirt, but also many other circumstances put your skin at risk such as excess of friction, shearing forces, urine, … One of the most frequently seen skin lesions is most certainly ‘blistering’. Indeed, how many times we all had a blister on the heel after wearing new shoes? Also deformation of extremities ( hallux ) can lead to painful skin irritation and blistering. Reskin Medical NV. has developed a new range of innovative products which allow to protect the skin.

image001

Aging Skin

 

‘Aging Skin’ is a common problem among elderly people ( > 80 years ) living in nursing homes, geriatric wards in hospitals or at home.

Aging skin is a major but largely under estimated risk factor which is not treated properly today. In general, ointments and all kind of creams are prescribed with the intention tokeep the skin more healthy and flexible. Also, all kind of tools and devices are used in a artisan way . None of these solutions are giving the aimed effects ( proper support of the skin, diminishing the effect of shearing forces, … ); often these solutions even enhance the risk factor and should therefore be prohibited.

Aging skin ends – if not treated properly – as a skin tear or other skin lesion as a result of external factors which can be:

  • Mechanical ( hurting skin against hard or sharp object )>> > skin tears
  • Scratching when itching ( ex leg ulcers ) >>> scratch injury
  • Moist/ humidity >>> intertrigo
  • Shearing or friction ( external prosthesis user, wheelchair user,…)

Science behind aging skin

aging_skin2During the aging process, a lot of histology changes happen. The number of collagen and elastin fibers diminish quite dramatic, the papillary layer between the dermis and the epidermis is thinning as well as the dermis and epidermis layer. Also, the volume of subcutaneous fat decreases.

Other changes are:

Vascular: arterial sclerosis in the small and larger blood vessels, thinning of the blood vessel wall and a less developed vascular network.

Cellular: diminishing number of sebaceous glands( gland that secretes sebum, which lubricates the skin and hair)and sweat glands ( gland that produces and secretes sweat).

The increased PH of the skin in combination with a increased loss of trans-epidermal water leads to a worsening of the skin hydration. The skin becomes thinner, dryer and fragile. As a consequence, the skin becomes less resistant to friction and shearing forces ; it’s only one step from the appearance of blistering, skin tears or abrasions after minor mechanical trauma.
Underlying causes of an aging skin:

  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • The usage of steroids and some topical agents
  • Dry skin
  • Radiation
  • Sun exposure

Care of aging skin

medical

  • Use proper positioning, turning, lifting, and transferring techniques to prevent friction or shear. A lift sheet should be used to move and turn patients. If the patient is being cared for at home, make sure home health care assistants and her family caregivers understand these techniques.
  • Provide a well-lit environment to minimize the risk of patients bumping into equipment or furniture.
  • Make sure nursing assistants and home health care assistants know the importance of carefully handling elderly patients with frail skin. Any harsh movement or pulling can create a skin tear.
  • Pad bed rails, wheelchair arm and leg supports, and any other equipment that may be used; this will protect the patient from accidentally bumping into a hard surface.
  • Use pillows and blankets to protect and support arms and legs.
  • Recommend that your patients wear long sleeves and pants to add a layer of protection.
  • Use a soft silicone dressing with ReSkin technology on frail skin and remove it gently. Do not use dressings with too high adhesive; High adherent dressings stick too hard and will harm the fragile skin and new skin tears will occur.
  • Mild cleansing agents should be used to minimize irritation and dryness; a mild cleanser should be non-alkaline to maintain the skin’s protective acid mantle. Force and friction applied to the skin during the cleansing process should be minimized.
  • Apply a moisturizing agent to dry skin to keep it adequately hydrated. Creams are better than lotions.

 

Important note: Moisturizing agents (creams, lotions) compromises the adherence of the soft silicone dressing with ReSkin technology. It is important that the skin is 100% dry before applying the dressing.

healed_woundsRecently healed wounds

Once, a wound is closed, the newly formed tissues are still very fragile. Tissues need to mature in order to get the original strength.

The maturation phase can last for a year or longer, depending on the size of the wound and whether it was initially closed or left open. During maturation, type III collagen,which is prevalent during proliferation, is gradually degraded and the stronger type I collagen is laid down in its place. Originally disorganized collagen fibers are rearranged, cross-linked, and aligned along tension lines.

As the phase progresses, the tensile strength of the wound increases, with the strength approaching 50% that of normal tissue by three months after injury and ultimately becoming as much as 80% as strong as normal tissue. Since activity at the wound site is reduced, the scar loses its red appearance as blood vessels that are no longer needed are removed by apoptosis.

Care of recently healed wounds

Supportive measures to avoid scars and to prevent recurrence of skin lesions after wound closed.

  • Use a soft silicone dressing with ReSkin technology on frail skin and remove it gently. Do not use dressings with too high adhesive; High adherent dressings stick too hard and will harm the fragile skin and new skin tears will occur.
  • Mild cleansing agents should be used to minimize irritation and dryness; a mild cleanser should be non-alkaline to maintain the skin’s protective acid mantle. Force and friction applied to the skin during the cleansing process should be minimized.
  • Apply a moisturizing agent to dry skin to keep it adequately hydrated.
  • Apply a soft silicone dressing with ReSkin technology for at least a couple of weeks in order to be sure tissues have regained sufficient tensile strength.

itchingItching

Itching is an intense, distracting irritation or tickling sensation that may be felt all over the skin’s surface, or confined to just one area. The medical term for itching is pruritus.

Itching instinctively leads most people to scratch the affected area. Different people can tolerate different amounts of itching, and anyone’s threshold of tolerance can be changed due to stress, emotions, and other factors. In general, itching is more severe if the skin is warm, and if there are few distractions.

This is why people tend to notice itching more at night. Stress and emotional upset can make itching worse, no matter what the underlying cause. If emotional problems are the primary reason for the itch, the condition is known as psychogenic itching.

Science behind itching

eczema2
Eczema is a form of dermatitis or inflammation of the epidermis (the outer layer of the skin). The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions. These include dryness and recurring skin rashes that are characterized by one or more of these symptoms: redness, skin edema (swelling), itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding. Areas of temporary skin discoloration may appear and are sometimes due to healed lesions. Scratching open a healing lesion may result in scarring and may enlarge the rash.

 

There are many different types of eczema; the most common are:

  • Atopic eczema: allergic disease believed to have a hereditary component and often runs in families whose members also have asthma. Itchy rash is particularly noticeable on head and scalp, neck, inside of elbows, behind knees, and buttocks.
  • Contact dermatitis: is of two types: allergic (resulting from a delayed reaction to some allergen, such as poison ivy or nickel), and irritant (resulting from direct reaction to a detergent or irritant.

Care of itchy skin

handle_scratch

How to handle scratch lesions due to eczema?

Scratching is an automatic reaction to itching and can cause minor skin lesions. Once healed, often, these ‘old’ scratch lesions give extra itching which gives a worsening of the skin condition. The skin becomes vulnerable to new lesions.

Try to find out the cause of the eczema & itching and follow the proposed treatment.

Apply a soft silicone dressing with ReSkin technology over the affected area to protect the skin from further damage. In case of already existing scratch wounds, the soft silicone dressing with ReSkin technology will support the wound healing process.

UA-537327-14